Best Type of Camera to Film Light show

Discussion in '101 Display Basics' started by pilbralights, Jan 27, 2017.

  1. pilbralights

    pilbralights Infected with CLAP

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    Does anyone have any recommendations for types of cameras used for filming there light shows?????? Any brands?? Types??? Also any helpful filming methods ????
     
  2. Benschristmaslights

    Benschristmaslights Dedicated Elf Global Moderator Generous Elf

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    i use a Nikon DSLR D3200 and works great
     
  3. swb

    swb New Elf

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    The quality of cameras these days is so good it doesn't much matter what camera you use. That said, you need to look for a camera where aperture can be set manually (with video shutterspeed doesn't matter quite as much). That will put you into the higher end point and shoot cameras or DSLR. Or look for a camera with a "fireworks" setting.
     
  4. videoman3857

    videoman3857 Full Time Elf

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    I use a Canon XF100 Professional video camera
    My advice is to use a camera where you have manual control of Aperture and focus
    Some auto focus units will shunt under certain lighting conditions.
    Manual control also allows you some creativity - You can create a Bokeh light opening or closure

    Also the time of night will govern how your video looks.
    Its best to take video and or photographs at what is commonly know as dusk or twilight.
    In Queensland we don't have a great of time to do this, so you may need to do it over a couple of days.
     
  5. swb

    swb New Elf

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    Yes manual focus. Good call! That or at the very least the ability to lock focus after attaining it from the auto-focus mechanism.
     
  6. Greg Young

    Greg Young New Elf

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    The problem with relying on even the initial set of an autofocus lock that the autofocus can have a difficult time getting a clear lock due to the contrasts between bright lighting and the dark background.
    In addition to manual focus, and manual exposure (aperture) control mentioned above, you should also look for a camera that will allow you to manually set the white balance as well.
    Given the widespread use of LEDs (RGB and otherwise), you can't rely on the few settings many cameras are limited to (i.e. incandescent, fluorescent, shade, full sun, etc). The best way it to balance with a neutral gray card using the light emitted by the display you are filming/photographing.
    I always carry a small one with me when using the camera.
    Greg
     
  7. videoman3857

    videoman3857 Full Time Elf

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    Yes, I forget that not everyone is into videography or photography.

    Neutral grey card is used for exposure and can be used for white balance in photography, with adjustments made in your editing program.
    However, a white card should used for white balance when using a video camera.
    It's so much easier doing it "in camera" than trying to crunch it in post in a video editing program.
     

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