Soldering crimp connectors

Discussion in 'Computers, Cabling & Other Miscellaneous Hardware' started by damo1271, Nov 22, 2014.

  1. damo1271

    damo1271 Full Time Elf Generous Elf

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    After just finishing making some power cables I was wondering...
    Does anyone else solder their crimp connectors, or is it just me that does this?
     
  2. David_AVD

    David_AVD Good news, everyone!

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    I used to a long long time ago, but not these days. If you use the correct tool and sized crimp there should be no need.
     
  3. Steve22537

    Steve22537 Full Time Elf

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    Yes I still do, only because I haven't the right crimp tool, another 120 crimps to do...

    Steve
     
  4. Benschristmaslights

    Benschristmaslights Dedicated Elf Global Moderator Generous Elf

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    buy yourself the crimping tool it is the best thing to do and saves a lot of time. mine also has wire strippers on it.
     
  5. David_AVD

    David_AVD Good news, everyone!

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    Here's an example of a cheap crimp tool (Altronics) but I don't recommend them at all.

    Here's an example of a reasonable quality crimp tool from Altronics. This is the style to get.
     
  6. kool-lites

    kool-lites Full Time Elf

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    Although one wouldn't solder insulated crimps. Unless you like the smell of burning plastic.

    I dont solder crimps cause it can spoil the spring in the contacts.
    $5 crimpers will only give a $5 crimp. Buy the best you can afford. My Harwing and AMP crimpers are still top notch.
     
  7. Fing

    Fing Full Time Elf Generous Elf

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    Surprisingly a proper crimped connection gives a better joint than soldering. Lash out and buy some good quality "ratchet" crimpers from an electrical wholesaler. Automotive type crimpers are basically useless.


    Cheers
    Fing
     
  8. Superman

    Superman I Have C.L.A.P and its very infectious Global Moderator

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    Plus 1 for the good ratchet tool here
     
  9. fasteddy

    fasteddy I have C.L.A.P Global Moderator Generous Elf

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    +1 for this
     
  10. mborg10

    mborg10 Michael Borg

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    If you watch the youtube show mighty car mods there is an argument over soldering or just twisting wires together. A car has lots of vibration and solder joints can break where twisted wires can flex. No conclusion to this argument.
     
  11. plasmadrive

    plasmadrive Full Time Elf

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    Being a long time control panel eng and manufacturer, I have a real hard time with this statement. Have you anything to back this up? I would be very curious to see the data..

    Crimp connections with the proper tool are very good, however, a solder connection done correctly is better as far as I can tell. Crimp connections in certain situations can have expansion and contraction issues over time with heat and cold. Solder not as much... at least in my experience.

    As well, by many codes and standards you can solder multiples of wires (more than 2) together as a single joint where as the same is not usually true of a crimp connection.... There are of course some exceptions..
     
  12. battle79

    battle79 Full Time Elf

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    Plasma,

    I think you missed one of the points at the beginning. They're talking about soldering a crimp connector onto the end of a cable and then putting it into a screw terminal. I have to agree that anything soldered should not be put into a screw terminal as the solder joint is likely to fail over time.

    If we are just talking about joining wires together, then you are totally correct, solder is better.

    Basic rule I learnt first year of my apprenticeship is that no soldered joint should be put under any mechanical strain, be it tension or pressure.

    Regards,
    Rowan
     
  13. plasmadrive

    plasmadrive Full Time Elf

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    Ah yes.. But help me out a bit.. When I built large ion laser supplies we always crimped then soldered the high power connections on fork terminals. The same is true for many motor connections from manufacturers and rebuilders. Those fork or ring terminals were put under screws and all was good. I assume no one meant this type of set up was not a good idea. (correct?)

    Now if you mean don't tin a wire or pair of wires and then put that under a screw directly, I get that part for sure.... That is bad juju
     
  14. multicast

    multicast Senior Elf Generous Elf

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    If its crimped, then its not soldered. Soldered joints shoud'tn be put under any mechanical strain.. Solder will creep.


    One or the other, but not both.
     
  15. Fing

    Fing Full Time Elf Generous Elf

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    Hi Plasma,
    I've been in the industrial electronics control workplace for 35yrs and have always been under the impression that "crimp beats solder". Where this came from I don't know, so I accept your challenge to find some data to support or reject this idea ;) .


    to start I found this from a RF manufacturer http://www.rfcoaxconnectors.com/Technical_CrimpvsSolder.htm


    This site was also very interesting http://www.marinewireandcable.com/2013/11/crimping-vs-soldering-marine-cable-and.html


    Their drawback #4 which deals with crimp then solder addresses one of your other posts. they describe it as "functionally unnecessary", which is what I've always been told.


    This site has some interesting photo's, which i think gets to the heart of the matter. The question should be "which is better, for what application, and who/how are the joints made ?" http://www.stevemeadedesigns.com/board/topic/139795-the-ultimate-answer-on-solder-vs-crimp/


    But all this is insignificant against the real question…. "why is it that Americans don't pronounce the "L" in soLder?" ;)


    Cheers
    Fing
     

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