arduino temp rating for cold

Discussion in 'Computers, Cabling & Other Miscellaneous Hardware' started by razataz327, Jun 18, 2016.

  1. razataz327

    razataz327 Garnet

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    Hi all not sure where to post this but lets start here. I am in the planning stage for this years display. I live in Canada so the winter can get a little cold. The last few years have been great but that can change. I am looking for specs on the arduino type boards and relay boards. I can install them in my heated garage or to save on wire place them in a sealed box in the yard near the display. If they were outside do I build a heated box?
    Any help would be appreciated.
    Thanks
    Garnet
     
  2. Richie4540

    Richie4540 Apprentice Elf

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    Electronics like the cold, except for things like lcd displays which start to freeze around -15 , most of the pixel lights won't care one bit, so you won't need a heater in any boxes and unless you stay with string lights it's unlikely that you will be using too many relays, having a power supply in a box will generate some heat anyway if it's not vented to outside. We have the opposite hassle here in Aus as we need to be aware of overheating in our control boxes if you jam too much in one control box. Check out the lighting manual for ideas on how it all works.


    Richie
     
  3. fasteddy

    fasteddy I have C.L.A.P Global Moderator Generous Elf

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    What temps are you wanting to design to, I doubt the arduino would be made from Military specification components and would most probably be in the industrial range

    •Full military (-55°C to +125°C)
    •Automotive (-40°C to +125°C)
    •AEC-Q100 Level 2 (-40°C to +105°C)
    •Extended industrial (-40°C to +85°C)
    •Industrial (-20°C to +85°C)

    Normally cold temps are not as big an issue as hot temps. The main issues you may see with very low temps is that the resistance values change and electronics may not work within its designed parameters. The best way to keep things warm is to have the power supply in the same enclosure
     

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