Meanwell models

spazmanaught

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Hi,
Can anyone tell me the differences between the two Meanwell units LRS-350-12 and RSP-320-12? On a comparison it's just a couple things but the price difference is a fair bit.
 

Mark_M

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Model number indicates the LRS-350-12 is 350w and the other is 320w. 2.5A difference isn't much.

The RSP-320-12 has more certifications and is part of a different series to the other.
Likely one is for a more specialist use than the other.
 
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scamper

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the 320 is more efficient but also it is self switching on the input side, ie no need to change a switch for 110 or 230vac.
that is pretty much what I can see as the main difference. Unless you are travelling the world with your display, I don't see a need to pay the extra for it ;)
 

darylc

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power factor correction is present in the RSP version and not the LRS. The LRS is illegal to sell/(use?) in certain parts of the world.
 

David_AVD

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In general, you get what you pay for. The cheaper models are lower spec'd (performance wise). Personally I use the RSP series.
 

TerryK

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As the purchaser, you will need to determine if the better specs are worth the cost difference.

The Meanwell RSP series specifications are pretty much all equal or better than the LRS series. I would add that the PF correction and better efficiency will lower its operating cost although I'm not sure how much. David_AVD sums it rather well, in just about every instance, a cheaper product has a lesser quality. Mark_M mentioned certifications, although I think Mark meant the RSP has better certs than the LRS series. Meanwell's market point is directed at a tighter spec use; RF and test/measurement instrumentation for the RSP series.

Too, if there is a particular supply specification you do not understand or are curious about, those of us here will help best as we can.
 

Mark_M

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Mark_M mentioned certifications, although I think Mark meant the RSP has better certs than the LRS series.
Oh whoops; right..... Going crossed eyed between datasheets. Corrected above.
 
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spazmanaught

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Thanks everyone. I think I'll go for the RSP's for now.

Just on the connections I notice that the power supplies have one input but looks like three outputs but says 'single' output? I'm a little confused if I can use all three outputs or only one?



 

uncledan

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Good call on the RSP's. I've got 30+ of them and haven't had one fail yet. You can use all three outputs. I prefer to use 2-3 so I don't have all the current on one connection/output of the psu.
 

TerryK

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The supply pictured in your inserted graphic is a single output supply. All of the +V terminals are connected together by traces on the PC board. So too are all the -V terminals. As mentioned by 'uncledan', you can use any one, any two, or all three of the +V terminals. And again, so too for the -V terminals.
It is fairly common for higher wattage supplies to have multiple terminals to spread current draw. This helps prevent heat damage to the PC board at the terminal/PCB junction. It also allows smaller diameter wire to be used if the user prefers in which case correct fusing needs to be considered.
 
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SirBob

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So just to be clear on above. You can use a single power supply to power both power inputs on a Sandevice E682?
 

David_AVD

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Yes, a single power supply can feed multiple controllers, or more than one side of a single controller. Just make sure that the wiring is heavy enough and that the power supply is rated for the total load (of pixels) you're powering.
 
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